Sunday, 3 November 2013

SAWBONNA: SNOW FALLING. AND WONDER

"Rather than view the world with skepticism, I suggest that we approach it in awe. Margot's story and poetry reaffirm this for me. Awe at the unanticipated possibilities that even suffering can offer. Wonder at the human potential for change, awe at the power of (our) words and stories." Professor Howard Zehr, in Sawbonna: I See You

Abundant snow fell yesterday. Such wonder birthed in its falling.  Each time I watch a new snow fall, I am mesmerized by how its falling is its speaking. Listening to the snow speak reminded me of the precious gift that is Sawbonna: I see you; You see me; I hear you; You hear me. In sitting with the fact that each of us yearns to be seen and heard by at least one other, I remind myself that living justice is an invitation to speak in the ways that can inform, inspire, enrage, compel, ignite.  Siblings of Nature, of snow, we too, have voices. We too can speak our passion and yearning for the values of: respect, responsibility, relationship, and wonder, as kindred, Howard Zehr, wrote in his introduction to my book, Sawbonna: I See You. Wonder at the knowing that we are more than victim, more than offender. More than spectator to how justice means in our communities and societies. Our voices matter.

8 comments:

  1. Margot,

    this has the feel of a haibun. Grief turned into the rich lyrical outpourings of a heart attuned to Nature's healing snows...

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    1. Grief is a road, a camino. I am reading Nancy Cater's work on Electra and her grief. Fascinating view on how and what grief means and can mean. It is certainly not a staid, stuck, and stultifying process. Paradox-steeped process!

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  2. And then there's Antigone's, richly intertwined as hers is in Sophocles' great play with a sense of civic propriety and familial obligation. Antigone's grief amounted to just a simple act of scattering dust over her dead brother's body...

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    1. How we each find our way to dance. Demeter chose to share in mediation with Hades re: Persephone. Powerful, the stories. The myths...

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  3. Earliest tragedy, a goat song, was always accompanied by the dance. The insight into the connection of dance to the sorrowful heart is profound...

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    1. The saying of mine that infuses my fingers to the keyboard and pen to the page is, "To dance with words, is to be nourished." Directly from, for, to, and with the heart. The heart in all its many feelings, forms, resonances etc...

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  4. Margot,

    here's a curious passage from Durrell's "The Alexandria Quartet" describing the mournful dance of female-mourners around the dead Narouz: "The women were dancing now as they circled the body, striking their breasts and howling, but dancing in the slow measured figures of a dance recaptured from long-forgotten friezes upon the tombs of the ancient world. They moved and swayed, quivering from throat to ankles, and they twisted and turned calling upon the dead man to rise."

    I see here (do you?) the rise of divinity itself in the mourner's dance. Is it possible that the dance of death, ancient as the Egyptians, prefigured a religion based on the hope of rising from death through the shrills of dance and lamentation?

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    1. What a poignant, and beautiful insight, Conrad. Thank you!

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